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A consistently small target window is essential to your pitching success. Your success begins with the way your “fight or flight response” interprets your movements into your starting position.

An exceptional ending tells you how to begin.

At the end of your stride, to categorically outperform other pitchers, you create a 3-dimensional reaction where, to get your body back in balance,  your subconscious forces you to make a throwing (re)action. You make this happen by coming into your stride with ...

  1. Your hips already level,
  2. Your upper body already vertical and
  3. Your shoulders free and ready to respond.

Your consistent and exceptional performances are driven by this 3-dimensional starting position.

Your starting position separates exceptional from ordinary.

The only difference between a fully integrated, 3-dimensional ball release and a less-effective, 1-dimensional (shoulders only) ball release is your upper body angle as you complete your starting position.

  • With a 3-dimensional starting position, you come out of your starting position with your upper body already forming the rotational axis. This type of preparation means, the instant you end your stride, your subconscious tendency to get your body back in balance means you instantaneously complete your delivery with exceptional command, maximum velocity and very late ball movement.
  • With a 1-dimensional starting position, you move down the mound with a home-to-second upper body tilt. When you let his happen, before you can complete your motion, you force your body to bring itself back to 3-dimensional standards. These preventable adjustments generate your current pitching struggles.

How do you create a 3-dimensional starting position?

Simple … you follow these clear-cut recommendations.

1. Begin with your feet one baseball width apart.

  • By beginning your motion with your feet any wider than this, the sway produced by your front foot lift means your subconscious creates an upper body tilt.
  • When you begin with your feet one baseball width apart, because your foot lift runs parallel to your upper body, you remain vertical.

2. Make sure you begin with a slight back knee flex.

  • Your feet can be one baseball width apart, but, because one leg is straighter than the other, when you lift your front foot, you force your subconscious to produce a slight upper body tilt.
  • To avoid this, you simply flex your knees. Your subconscious automatically centers your weight between your feet. This simple flex effectively eliminates any chance your subconscious senses a weight shift.

If you currently end your starting position with even a slight upper body tilt, by adding these 2 simple skills to your mound routine, your worst misses end up closer to your target than ever!

Your foot placements are just the beginning.

Bookmark this blog and, next week, we’ll go into how to end your front leg lift with your 3-dimensional body position still intact.

Let us know how you’re doing?
When you use these skills and still find yourself struggling with your command, send us a pitching motion video or attach a comment to this post. We’ll use your video and comments to resolve the foot placements and leg orientations standing in the way of you being exceptional.

Tell a friend!
Know a Pitcher struggling on the mound? Make sure to share this blog with them!

Want to fast track your personal improvement? Please feel free to contact me.

Skip Fast

Expert Pitching Coach
Professional Pitching Institute

WWW: http://www.propitchinginstitute.com 

E-Mail: skip@propitchinginstitute.com
Cell or Text: 856-524-3248

 

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