CheckSwing

The Premier Baseball Social Network for Players, Coaches, Scouts, and Umpires

Who has the advantage… the pitcher or the hitter?

To have an advantage over the hitter, you use your lower body to place each pitch into your Catcher’s target.

  • No matter the grip or release, every pitch shows a fastball throwing arm speed, comes out of the same release window and goes into the Catcher’s target with extremely late ball movement
  • Your Team bases their selection on movements and locations known to challenge the Hitter to make solid contact with your offerings and you produce.

The hitter controls you when your easily managed starting position causes you to complete your front leg lift with your back shoulder off your target line. 

  • Your back-shoulder position forces you to hope your eye-hand coordination is enough to get you through each at bat.
  • You try to throw pitches in specific locations, but, because you struggle to hit your spots, the most patient hitters merely wait to drive a pitch that misses over the plate.

 Want to be dominant? Ask us what simple adjustments to make that’ll instantly get you on the path to the dominance you’ve always dreamed of having.

 

Skip Fast,
Director – National Coaching Network

Professional Pitching Institute

Web: www.propitchinginstitute.com 
E-mail: skip@propitchinginstitute.com
Cell or Text: 856-524-3248

 

Copyright © 2017

The Pro Pitching Institute.

Views: 75

Comment by Richard Lovell on November 14, 2017 at 11:40am

I am not sure about the way Skip explains it here because the title states advantage and then he talks about controlling, but in my opinion, the Pitcher always has the advantage over the hitter. The Pitcher/Catcher know what pitch they are going to throw, what location they are trying to hit, speed, etc. The Hitter is always "guessing" at what the Pitcher is going to present. It may be an educated guess based on previous information gathered, but that is always just a guess...educated or not.

Comment by L.A. "Skip" Fast on November 14, 2017 at 3:40pm

Richard,

I once thought the same thing for the same reasons, but then I realized the best professional hitter's batting averages are higher against relievers than against #1 starters.

Since then, over more years than I want to admit, I regularly see #1 starters use their lower body to dominate the highest level of professional hitter and the pitchers who don't use their lower body give the best professional hitters an advantage over them.

Therefore, from my experience and based on easily researched stats, the gap between professional hitter doing better against relievers than #1 Starter directly relate to the pitcher's lower body engagement.

Excellent comment.

Skip Fast, 
Director – National Coaching Network

Professional Pitching Institute

Web: www.propitchinginstitute.com 
E-mail: skip@propitchinginstitute.com
Cell or Text: 856-524-3248

Comment by Richard Lovell on November 14, 2017 at 9:48pm

Hey Skip...nice response, but comparing to smaller aspect of pitching, not a specialist that typically comes in throwing heat, is easier to figure out. It may not be easier to hit, although by your stats it appears they are, but when throwing a fastball they just have get the barrel out front and sort of hope they are on the right path. 400 miliseconds isn't very long, less than the blink of an eye and that is how long it takes with a 100mph pitch and less as the velo increases. As far as lower body engagement being the primary factor, I understand we need lower body for velocity (upper/lower separation), but there are other factors involved as well...timing, ground force-which lower body engagement creates of course, etc, etc. I still say, overall, the pitcher has the advantage for the reasons you and I agreed on. I would imagine if you went far enough back the batters stats would be even higher because starters went deeper int he game. In today's game, hitters rarely see a starter for more than 3-5 innings, the mid-guy comes in for 1-2 and then closer after closer, etc. Hard to get a feel for a pitcher int hat short period of time, but I suppose like you say, hitters will begin to make adjustments faster as the game evolves. Good stuff, Skip.

Comment by L.A. "Skip" Fast on November 15, 2017 at 6:34am

Richard,

Thanks for taking the time to respond.

The way the human body responds to itself clearly differentiates between the "can do's" and "hope to do's"...

1. "Can do" pitchers who make fewer mistakes because they let their lower body drive each pitch into their catcher's target.
2. "Hope to do" pitchers miss their target over the plate more often than the "can do's" because they rely on eye-hand coordination to deliver each pitch into their target.

No matter the pitcher, professional hitters are trained to drive a pitcher's mistakes. "Can do" pitchers makes fewer mistakes than "hope to do" pitchers.

Skip Fast, 
Director – National Coaching Network

Professional Pitching Institute

Web: www.propitchinginstitute.com 
E-mail: skip@propitchinginstitute.com
Cell or Text: 856-524-3248

Comment

You need to be a member of CheckSwing to add comments!

Join CheckSwing

Get Your CheckSwing Badge !

Loading…

Events

Audio

Loading…

© 2017   Created by Kyle Grucci.   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service

-->